CBSE Paper Checking Rules For Class 10: Understand Marking Scheme

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The CBSE doesn’t publicly disclose specific, detailed checking rules for Class 10 exams. However, there are general guidelines and resources that can help you understand the process.

CBSE Paper Checking Rules For Class 10

Below we have listed the rules on which basis teachers check and give marks for answers of the students in board.

Correct Answers:

For every correct answer. Generally marks are as per Section and their question types.

  • In Section A (MCQs), 1 mark is awarded for each correct answer.
  • In Section B (Short Answer Type-I), 2 marks are awarded for each correct answer.
  • In Section C (Short Answer Type-II), 3 marks are awarded for each correct answer.
  • In Section D (Long Answer Type), 5 marks are awarded for each correct answer.
  • In Section E (Source-based/case-based/passage-based), 4 marks are awarded for each correct answer.

Incorrect Answers:

In CBSE exams, there is usually no negative marking for incorrect answers in MCQs.

If a student answers multiple-choice questions, fills in the blanks, matches items, or responds to true/false statements incorrectly, the system deducts the full 1 mark.

If a student provides an incorrect or irrelevant answer to subjective questions, the teacher may deduct marks based on the quality of the response.

Partial Marking:

In subjective sections like Section B, C, and D, teachers may award partial marking if students demonstrate partial knowledge or understanding of the question. Partial Marking varies on steps and content about question. Below is an overview for partial marking in each subjects:

Mathematics:

  • In Mathematics, teachers often award partial marking for demonstrating correct steps or methods, even if the final answer is incorrect.
  • For example, if a student makes a computational error in a multi-step problem but demonstrates the correct method, they might receive partial marks for each correct step shown.
  • In geometry, teachers can award partial marks for correctly applying theorems or formulas, even if there are errors in the construction or calculation.
  • If a student correctly identifies the problem-solving approach but makes a mistake in the calculations, they may receive partial credit for the method used.

Science:

  • In Science subjects such as Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, teachers often award partial marking for demonstrating an understanding of scientific principles and concepts.
  • For experimental questions, if a student makes a procedural error but demonstrates an understanding of the scientific method and the underlying principles, they may receive partial marks.
  • In questions requiring explanations or reasoning, teachers can award partial marks for providing relevant information, even if it’s not entirely accurate or complete.
  • If a student provides correct explanations but makes minor errors in terminology or calculations, they may still receive partial credit.

Social Science:

  • In Social Science subjects like History, Geography, Civics, and Economics, teachers often give partial marking for demonstrating an understanding of key concepts, events, or theories.
  • For essay-type questions, if a student provides relevant information but fails to cover all aspects of the question, they may still receive partial credit for the points they have addressed.
  • In map-based questions, teachers can award partial marks for correctly locating some but not all points, or for providing additional relevant information related to the map.
  • If a student demonstrates an understanding of cause-and-effect relationships, even if their explanation is incomplete or lacks detail, they may still receive partial marks.

Method Marks:

Method marks might be awarded for demonstrating the correct approach or method, even if the final answer is incorrect. This is more common in math and science subjects.

In Class 10 board exams, method marks are awarded in subjects like Mathematics and Science for demonstrating the correct problem-solving approach, even if the final answer is incorrect.

Mathematics Example:

  • If a student correctly applies the quadratic formula but makes a computational error while solving for (x), they’d still receive method marks for showing the correct method.

Science Example:

  • In a physics problem, if a student correctly identifies the formula for power but makes a calculation mistake, they’d still get method marks for using the right formula.

Method marks are essential as they encourage students to understand the processes and methods involved, fostering deeper learning beyond mere memorization of answers.

Quality of Expression:

Marks may also be awarded based on the quality of expression, clarity, and coherence of the answer, especially in subjective sections.

In the Class 10 board exam, especially in subjects like English, Social Science, and Languages, quality of expression plays a significant role in scoring marks. Here’s how it works with examples:

English:

  • In literature-based questions, students are expected to express their understanding of themes, characters, and literary devices clearly and coherently.
  • Example: If a question asks for an analysis of a character’s development in a novel, students who provide a well-structured answer with clear examples and insightful interpretations will receive higher marks compared to those with vague or unclear responses.
  • In writing tasks such as essays or letters, marks are awarded not only for the content but also for the clarity of expression, organization of ideas, and appropriate language usage.
  • Example: In an essay discussing the impact of technology on society, a student who presents their arguments logically, supports them with relevant examples, and maintains a coherent flow throughout the essay will receive higher marks.

Social Science:

  • In subjects like History, Geography, Civics, and Economics, quality of expression is crucial for conveying historical events, geographical phenomena, political concepts, and economic theories effectively.
  • Example: When answering a question about the causes of a historical event, students who provide a well-structured response with clear explanations and contextual details will receive higher marks compared to those with disorganized or unclear answers.
  • In map-based questions, students need to label maps accurately and provide clear explanations for the geographical features or historical events depicted.
  • Example: In a question requiring students to mark the trade routes on a map and explain their significance, those who label the routes accurately and provide concise yet informative explanations will score better.

Languages:

  • In languages such as Hindi, Sanskrit, or any other regional language, clarity of expression is essential for effectively communicating ideas, themes, and concepts.
  • Example: When answering comprehension passages or literature-based questions, students who express their understanding of the text clearly and coherently, using appropriate language and vocabulary, will receive higher marks.
  • In grammar-based questions, marks are awarded not only for correct answers but also for the clarity and precision of language usage.
  • Example: In a question testing grammar rules such as verb conjugation or sentence construction, students who demonstrate a clear understanding of the concepts and use language accurately will score better.

Presentation:

Presentation of answers, including neatness, organization, and proper labeling where required, can also influence the marks awarded.

Length of Answers:

While there’s no fixed rule about the length of answers, generally, concise and relevant answers are preferred.

However, in sections where long answers are expected, such as Section D, it is essential to provide comprehensive responses.

Content Relevance:

The relevance and accuracy of the content provided determine the awarded marks. Tangential or irrelevant information may not fetch marks.

Following Instructions:

Teachers can also deduct marks if a student fails to follow the provided instructions, such as word limit, formatting requirements, etc.

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